FUDiabetes

What app do you use to track meals, insulin used, etc.?

#1

I’m curious what apps people are using to keep track of their total daily dose, meals, and the insulin that they take. Also curious about apps for carb counting.

I came across this thread, but it wasn’t exactly what I was looking for (just a couple of options other than the Dex or xDrip).

I thought it might be helpful to have a post that collected people’s diabetes tracking apps and/or techniques. We are searching for a solution still (trying Diabetes:M this week - thanks, @kenrick ). It’s hard to want to commit to the more expensive apps, if people don’t really like them. So I figured I’d ask you guys what you like!

EH and I are back to carb counting and trying to figure out all the ratios and TDD to get ready for the OmniPod. :slight_smile:

1 Like

#2

I log everything in my pump and CGM and download them to Diasend to analyze data. If I take an IM injection, I enter that into either my CGM or Contour Next USB meter (this is one reason I haven’t upgraded to the Next One, though I do own one, I can’t log insulin doses). I also try to enter carbohydrates I eat with no bolus, such as treating a low, into either my CGM or meter so that it’ll show up in Diasend.

I use the Fitbit app to automatically record exercise (this unfortunately doesn’t integrate into Diasend very well). I can also log detailed meals (exactly what I ate and macronutrients) through this app, but I only do that occasionally when I feel like my diet is getting off track.

I use the CalorieKing app to look up carbohydrate counts. (I also have a tiny scale that I carry around in my bag to weigh things like apples, so I can look up the exact number of carbohydrates it has rather than guessing.)

3 Likes

#3

Ditto.

:smile:

2 Likes

#4

I use the sugar mate app that follows dexcom - you can capture carbs / take photos of the food ! : look up carb content of brands and common foods
It’s better than dexcom as you can scroll backwards as far as you want - it also estimates your a1c
Developers have told me they are about tor release the following also

  • calorie counter
  • protein counter
  • insulin calculator - how much to dose for carb and protein and how much of bolus you have left
    Find it pretty useful - the only downside is the doctor can’t download
2 Likes

#5

The Glooko app lets you up upload Omnipod and Dexcom data. I have the app linked to the Dex on my iPhone but have to do a msnual upload of the pump data from the PDM.

2 Likes

#6

Once you get going with the pump, you can use it for logging.

But until then, calorie king is good for for counting carbs. And just writing down numbers for a few good days that seem “normal” will give you a good ballpark for TDD.

You just want to get in the ballpark, because once you start it, you will be making adjustments to fine-tune it.

2 Likes

#7

I am part of a dwindling minority. (Of several, probably.) While I am far from a technophobe, I find I prefer a certain simplicity in life. And so I keep the same pen-and-paper records I did while on MDI.

My PDM logs, and uploads to Diasend, test results and carb and insulin numbers, but I do not use any apps. I do refer to various carb databases (online, not on a phone). On the same monthly printout page I’ve used for decades, I write down test results, carbs, and doses, with notes such as “no prebolus” or a number for level of activity or an ® for a low. Finding the info I need is easier and faster than scrolling through the PDM history or logging into Diasend. I also keep a 200-page notebook in which I write down every single thing I eat, with carb breakdown and any pertinent notes, such as the details of an extended bolus, or that I didn’t finish my dessert. (Well, maybe not that last one.)

It may seem like a lot of writing, but it really isn’t, and I’ve been doing it for more than 25 years so it just seems second nature. I tell myself almost daily that it’s largely redundant given my PDM and Diasend, but I can find, within seconds, any D information I need for a particular day in any recent year.

3 Likes

#8

I tried a bunch of them and for now I’ve been using PredictBGL to log everything and MyFitnessPal to count carbs. I wish it would sync with MFP but I like how it syncs with the dex… I absorb both carbs and insulin more slowly than the default setting predict and still haven’t figured out exactly how to use the exercise factors.

2 Likes

#9

Hmmm, the only app I use for food intake is my brain and memory, such as they are. I do record all my insulin intake in my BG meter so I can figure TDD and watch for changes. I used a spreadsheet and even a portable scale a decade ago or so when I got serious about counting carb and applying the food and insulin lessons in the excellent Using Insulin book by Walsh.

2 Likes

#10

Not the answer you are looking for :slight_smile: but… I use Android APS running on my smart phone (with xdrip+ as the data collector for the Dexcom G5) and Nightscout running on a free web service account.

Android APS has a nice interface to log data into Nightscout Careportal so I log sensor changes, pod changes, extended boluses, temp basals, carbs, boluses, and notes.

Nightscout also does all sorts of data analysis and stats so I have never felt in want of any reporting to take in to the endo.

…but then again I am a bit of a tech guy and this is not for the faint of tech.

All the hardware you need for this now is an Andriod phone and a Dexcom G5.

And here is an example of the data and the notes that are available (on the left is the pump basal profile I am using)…

Here are the links:

https://jamorham.github.io/#xdrip-plus

5 Likes

#11

i am very old school about it. i do everything manually with a pen and paper. i made up graphs for myself, each day on a page. i literally write down and document EVERYTHING. it makes it very easy for me to see patterns in the event that i need to make changes in my pump. i can change basal rates, ICRs, TBs, corrections, etc etc. also, i can easily go backwards and see what worked at other times or what didn’t work at all. i do this month by month and then i staple the pages together and file them away. i generally do about 3 months at a time so that when its time to go to my endo, i have everything on hand. ( i even write down things like illnesses and food reactions, exercise, activity levels)

hope this helps you or anyone else out there. i know that paper and pen are not the most high tech thing these days, but it works great for me :sunny:

4 Likes

#12

The more I see of xDrip+ the more impressed I get! It also looks to be a really nice solution for libre users wanting CGM functionality.

2 Likes

#13

Right now we use MyNetDiary, Diabetes version (about $60/year) for everything. It has worked well for us because we can all see everything. But I intend to try Nightscout as a consolidator.

0 Likes

#14

As a beginner I wrote everything in one of those marbled essay books so that I could learn cause and effect. But after I got the Dex and started surfing, I no longer had the patience for all those records. I even pollute the data I give to the t:slim bolus wizard by adjusting the carbs I enter rather than taking the extra steps to enter BG. Now I maintain a written notebook for just 2 purposes. First, I write down BG / SG 4 times per day so that I can “prove” that I check my BG. Second, I write down all time-sensitive data, such as set changes, sensor changes and restarts, and cartridge changes and refills. I use a physical notebook because it works even when I don’t have internet. And also because I’m old and like paper.

5 Likes

#15

Here’s an interesting point of view:

5 Likes

#16

Hi @CatLady ,
I know this is an old thread but still wanted to post - thank you for this article, it really speaks to how I feel/ what I want from all the apps, diabetes-related tech out there.

2 Likes