FUDiabetes

40 Years - Type 1

This week is my 40th diabetes anniversary. I was diagnosed during the county fair so it’s easy to remember. It was pretty classic systoms; boy who pees alottttttttt:) My mom knew right away that I had diabetes (my dad also had it) and convinced the nurse, who thought she was an overly concerned mom, to let me see the doctor. After seeing the doctor, I was sent to the hospital (not before one last hurrah at Dairy Queen before the trip…funny but, good memory.) I spent the next week in the hospital.

First Insulin - Lente and Regular - twice a day
Testing - Urine (using test tube, a tablet, and a certain amount of urine)
Diet - Exchange - 2 bread, 3 meat, 1 fruit.
Diet Soda - Tab

Here’s to the next 40🍻!!

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Way to go, @jim26! Way to thrive all these years!

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Wow! Great Story, and Congrats on the diaversary! It is a big one.

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My story is identical to yours. Only exception is that I went to Darby’s ice cream rather than Dairy Queen and then was diagnosed. Local hospital couldn’t get my blood sugar under control so I was sent to Joslin Clinic. Still a crazy ride. Wish they had this technology when I was young.

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I am also treated at Joslin clinic. I was diagnosed Type 2 at the local hospital (Cambridge City) and only when I went to Joslin did they diagnose it as Type 1. That was 11 years ago - I remember because it was my 50th birthday.

I was amazed at the difference in protocol and knowledge between Joslin and Cambridge City. It helps to be seeing diabetics all the time. Research is important too.

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Amazing! Here’s to 40 more.

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:partying_face: Congrats @jim26 - may your 2nd 40 be less eventful than the first :crazy_face:

And I toast you on the Lente, the Clinitest, sterilizing your glass syringe and Tab *Special mention to Fresca, which was the only other go to sugar free soda at the time :champagne:

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THANKS!!! I couldn’t remember the name for the life of me!

I missed out on the glass syringe, but saw my dad’s with a sharpening stone.:astonished:

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Clinitabs IRC; one test tube about 50mm long and the diameter of the tablet, urine to the line (or was it a certain number of drops, I seem to remember a dropper, then water to the line?) Add tablet, exothermic reaction, coloured solution. Ah, those were the days. I had a glass syringe too, they gave me several needles, no sharpening stone, but I think I just used the same one for a year or two.

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I remember 5 drops of pee, was it 10 drops of water? The tablet was pretty much all submerged when you dropped the pill

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Yup, that sounds right.

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Yes, sounds right. I knew testing the chlorine levels on the swimming pool reminded me of something.

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Ah! The last meal. Mine was a bowl of what is called in the UK “rice pudding”, straight out of the can!

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Ha…it sure was…lol…Love rice pudding(not sure if the UK version is like the U.S.???)

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I remember it fizzing up when tablet dropped in, and getting very hot before comparing to the color chart, and then logging for doctor visit. I started on Lente only in 1965.

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Good for you, Jim. I’m a month away from 38 year diagnosis. Blood test strips had just come on the market, praise the Lord! Hang in there!

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I was diagnosed in April 1972. I too started with Lenten and Silubin Retard tablets at first and then started using Actrapid instead of the tablets. Testing my urine though was a bit different. I used an inch of a dark blue solution into which I put some drops of urine and then boiled them over a small bunsen burner. One had to be careful and remove the solution from over the flame immediately it started boiling or else it would flow out of the tube with a great force. Comparing the colours was similar to that of using the tablet. I was greatful when strips were introduced and more greatful still that I can now keep a 24-hour track thanks to sensors even though they cost an arm and a leg and I have to get them from overseas as Abbott will not sell them in Malta.

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Yup, I remember very clearly all of that. Diabetic 60 years as of last April…and still going strong…maybe not quite like 20 years ago but still going. :grinning:

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Thanks for the stories everyone. So much hope for my 12 year old, who just had his 1st diaversary. As an engineer, I also appreciate all the tech available from another angle, and we all certainly know how “easy” it is today. We still hate diabetes, of course :slight_smile:

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Andre, I would go with easier, but not easy. I really don’t know how those 50 year plus type 1 DMs keep it all together with nothing more than urine testing, animal sourced insulin, reusable syringes and giant needles that needed sharpening. Kudus to all of them.

As a type 2 DM I was glad to get my first glucometer. I was using strips that one compared to a color chart. Hoo Boy those were subjective. Now on MDI with a CGM I feel like I am in heaven, except, I’m waiting on FedEx on a transmitter as mine died.

It is good that your 12 year old is in this era. Tell him, we all have his back, he is not alone. This is a common concern amount young T1s. Maybe if Covid lets up they can attend a diabetes camp where they find out they are not the only one in the world. Plus they get to have some fun.

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