FUDiabetes

Planning event

I’m planning an event for T1D kids and their families. The activities are free . Any suggestions how I can attract families to come ? The diabetes clinics at the hospital have posted the flyer…

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I’m part of a local FB group for my particular county. Probably look up to see if your county has a T1D families group and join that and coordinate with them. That’s how we actively engage with others that live near us. Check with local hospitals for T1D programs that are offered in the area and advacacy groups and join them.

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JDRF also has local networking for parents: they might allow you to spread the news?

As for activities: do you have a range of ages for your guests?

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Have you contacted the local diabetes camp? I know we get a very energized group of parents that support the camp and its activities. They might be willing to do an email blast for you to a group that has already shown a predisposition to attend events.

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Why are you embarrassed?

Kids under 18 and their families. Skating, yoga, dance and conferences

I wanted to give the camp exposure and the event is a flop and I need to ask them to promote!

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There’s always the next event! Regroup, plan, network and advertise for the next one!

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Unfortunately, I don’t think this is unusual. My wife and I have planned events that could handle 40-50 attendees and had 4 attendees. If you keep doing it, it will eventually catch on. Some things take more than one event to take off. Also, T1D isn’t exactly a huge group of people.

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I would love to cancel! What kind of message am
I giving me own children ? I envisioned dozen and dozen of Kids testing their BGs and feeling great to do it among other T1D

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That is a really great vision. Perhaps you could refocus based on the response you have had, scale the event down to whatever level your participation is indicating, and then try to build it from there. Events aren’t easy to plan, promote and pull off.

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Kids have such a busy life that attending events is not a high priority—I wish it were different!

I organised a major local fundraiser for a parent with cancer a few years ago. By far the most popular activity was LaserTag battles. We made tons of money on that. The kids never seemed to tire of it :slight_smile: The age range was also really broad. Possibly it could be a attractive activity?

I hate to see you embarrassed after wanting to do a good turn to the D community :frowning:

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Has the event happened? Or is it just that very few people RSVPd? I’ve found that few people RSVP to anything lately; so there might still be hope of more attendance on the day!

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I’ve got nothing to contribute to the thread except to say you should not feel embarrassed. Not in the least. What a wonderful thing you’re doing, and keep in mind people on the other end might have their own feelings they’re trying to sort out. Even if it’s a flop, I hope it’s just your first flop. One will take.

That they are that important to you to put in time and energy into trying to do something good for them and your community. I can’t think of an ounce of negative that comes from that effort.

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I will admit that I am focus 24/7 on my daughter’s care… it’s my way to fight the Beast. The event will go on. Even if a dozen kids are present, they will feel a sense of community :slight_smile:

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:fist:

There’s no doubt they will. :cherry_blossom::heart:

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