Dexcom sensor code?

I placed a new Dexcom sensor earlier today and somehow misplaced the coding sticker (I let them sit on me for 12 hours before starting). Does anyone know if I need to use the actual code associated with the sensor or if I can use a generic code? (I.e., does the sensor “know” what code it’s supposed to be associated with?) I believe this one was 5941 (that’s a common D6 code, right?), but I’m not 100% sure. So frustrated with myself and don’t feel like starting it now (10:30pm my time) and dealing with errors through the night if I’m wrong and it gives me trouble. I could also wait through the night, but the sensor that’s currently running is starting to go a little funky. Ugh!!! Thanks for any insight anyone is able to give. Jessica

It needs to be the code that comes on the sensor sticker.

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The code number gives the calibration that says how high or low this particular sensor reads. If you use the wrong code number, the sensor will be inaccurate, perhaps dangerously so. So don’t use a code number that might not be the right one.

But you can always start the sensor in “No Code” mode. You’ll have to calibrate it from a fingerstick to start, and you’re supposed to recalibrate it when it asks.

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@JessicaD I may be a little on the persnickety side, but I’ve incorporated taking a picture of the back of the G6 “container” and code (same with my Omnipod Dash’s) everytime I change them out. That way I’m assured of having the data needed if I need to call either company and request a replacement incase either fails. It takes only seconds, and I always have my phone/camera right there anyway as it’s what I use to follow both devices. Perhaps something you can try?

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That’s exactly what we do, @TomH. Everytime we open a new sensor, I take a pic of the number on the sticker because I know by the time the first 10 days is up, I won’t remember the # for the 2nd session. It’s a common practice for us and follows along the same lines of “short pen makes long memory”…“snapping picture makes long memory.”

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You don’t need code just hit no code button. I have even had Dexcom replace sensor not knowing code.

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You all are wonderful – thank you so much (I had also totally forgotten about the “no code” option!). I wound up waiting through the night and found the code sticker backing under my toothpaste this morning! By rote, I place the code in the open Dexcom transmitter box and don’t know how I missed doing this this time. But I’m also going to take a pic of it as well now, like @TomH and @ClaudnDaye. Thanks again all!

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I learned something new! I didn’t even know you could start up a session w/o even entering a code…that seems somehow …not right, to me. Even if it’s possible!

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I used to take pictures to remember the codes. I also made sure the lot number, etc. where in the same picture. That way if I had to call support, I had all the info right there.

To be honest, I have entered the wrong code more than once, and the sensor still works fine. Not sure how far off the readings really are between different sensors. But there are not all that many different sensor codes anyways.
And yeah, I get it, I am not the normal on this, but like I said, I have done this more than once with no issues.

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Earlier this year I entered the wrong code by mistake, having mistakenly looked at the code from the previous sensor. I called Dexcom, hoping there was a way to restart it (without having to remove the transmitter). Since by the time I talked to him, it had already started reading at close to contour strip reading, he encouraged me to just keep it in. And it worked fine for the whole 10 days. But, he led me to believe some code substitutions could have caused a problem, but I would probably know with the early readings whether it would be. Well, that’s my one time it didn’t cause a problem, and Hammer’s more than one time – anyone have a time when it did cause a problem?

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Just spit balling here…but say you did enter the wrong code and the sensor readings were way off. Why then couldn’t you just reset the algo on the G6 the “old” way by using multiple CGM calibrations in a short period of time (10 minutes) . The old algo reset method still works - I have used it on several G6’s that have gone wonky in the last 6 months.

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I just chuck mine in the cutlery drawer and replace it with the new paper everytime I change.

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When you call Dexcom to get a replacement sensor, the questions they always ask are the lot # and when did you insert this sensor. I write the time of insertion (date and time), the code, and how many sensors has this transmitter seen on the paper label that contains the lot # and save it for as long as I’m wearing the sensor.

I’ve got a plastic container that has the overpatches, alcohol wipes, sharpie, the transmitter label (with the date on written on the back) and the above label so everything is in one place.

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Me too, but I keep the wipes and insulin in a seperate case. Besides writing the date and code on the label, I tape the code to it as well.

From what I have read Dexcom only has a few codes, supposedly they represent production line verses date, batch or any of the usual.

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That’s really interesting. If true, it pretty much means that what I said earlier is unfounded, maybe wrong, and maybe the code number has little bearing on any fine per-batch calibration of the sensor. Did I really pass along a false rumor and not a fact? This requires further examination.

What I do have direct from Dexcom is from What is a sensor code and why do I need one? | Dexcom

Do not use a code from a different sensor or make up a code. If you do, your sensor will not work as well and could display inaccurate data. If you lose the sensor code, you may calibrate your Dexcom G6 using fingersticks.

And from When to Calibrate Dexcom G6 and Fingersticks | Dexcom Provider

By entering the sensor code labeled on each sensor into the user’s display device, the Dexcom G6 provides accurate sensor glucose readings.

There is a list of known sensor codes from a Katie DiSimone posting (July 26, 2018) No-Code vs Code sessions – See My CGM

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Got to love myths, the code entered is a calibration code to enable accurate readings during warm up, nothing more, nothing less.

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@bkh I couldn’t get your link to work for me, but your reference to Katie resulted in: No-Code vs Code sessions – See My CGM as an alternative.

For those that aren’t aware: Katie Disimone is a stalwart supporter and component of Loop’s system development and documentation. She’s been a “go to” source for information on using Loop, Dexcom, and various pumps, as well as treating diabetes overall for several years. It is with deep regret she announced last year she was diagnosed with glioblastoma (very aggressive brain cancer) and is not expected to survive. Despite this, she’s remained a great source of information for all Loopers and diabetics world-wide. Her loss will be a loss to us all. If you’d like to help support her and her family, see Support Katie DiSimone and her family, organized by Kate Farnsworth.

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Thank you for the info. I hate the fact that I posted unfactual information,

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