Welcome, introduce yourself here!

Hi Rich, welcome!

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Welcome, and wow, 34 years puts you in our “experienced” group here. Looking forward to learning more about you and your insights on the boards. Also, 16 years from now when move to our “really experienced” group of diabetics. btw - the groupings are mine and completely informal, it is amazing how many folks have thrived despite the lack of tools in the good old days of diabetic care.

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Welcome to the group Rich!

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I’m not saying welcome to anyone anymore. Not because I’m unfriendly but because whenever I say welcome, people are never heard from again, or they soon disappear. @Henrik, @Momofm, @finny1981 … It’s kinda scary. :skull:

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It’s disappointing that many people don’t stick around, but I welcome people anyway. You never know on beforehand who’s going to become an active contributor.

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4 posts were split to a new topic: What is xDrip?

Hello everyone, my name is Sarah. I’m from Vancouver.
I’m a partner of T1, and she is keeping a lot out of me, so I wouldn’t worry too much. But I think that knowledge never hurts, so here I am - exploring about T1, so if anything happens, I am ready.

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Welcome? Vancouver bc or wa?

I can attest that it’s kind of a tough balance sometimes from the t1 perspective to find the right balance of your partner being part of that world… it’s not a simple equation… and that’s not because you don’t want to share things it’s just a burden a lot of which is ones own struggle for some people— then it only flares up to a common issue when it’s become a problem, which makes one want to keep it to themselves even more…

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BC :slightly_smiling_face:

I completely understand that it’s up to her whether to share this or not. But I also want to be supportive and helpful when it is needed. It is indeed complicated, but I know everything is gonna be alright.
I don’t want to push her for a talk a something, just you know, to do my own research and be ready for any surprises.

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Well its nice to meet you. My general advice on day one would be to become familiar with the day in and day out reality more so than the potential someday surprises. There’s thousands of years of experience here and we’re all happy to help in any way we can

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Thanks a lot, Sam :slight_smile:

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I’ll offer three thoughts. The first is that you should find out where she keeps the rescue glucagon and how to administer it in case she ever passes out. The second is that you can learn to recognize when she’s going hypo just because she’ll seem a bit off or less sharp when you interact with her. Don’t try to intervene, just keep a little more of an eye on her in case she gets into real trouble.

The third is the psychological aspect. For a type 1, the ongoing grind can wear us down. We always have to deal with our BG and there never is any time off, never ever. We have a target BG number where we want to be, and pretty much any time we check where we are, our BG is not the number we want, so it can start to seem like we fail every single test, no matter how hard we try. Depending on our personality, our reaction to all that can range anwhere from “oh, that’s really ok anyhow” to periods of complete despair and giving up entirely (“diabetes burnout”). The typical type 1 pretty much never wants to be asked questions like “What’s your BG?” or “Can you eat that?” so it’s really hard for someone to be helpful without causing resentment. The bright side is that after a type 1 learns how to manage the BG confidently, we’re just regular people living our life as everyone else does, we just have some extra minor nuisances that we’re always dealing with in the background.

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Well said!

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@bkh’s reply is a good one, but as I read it, it assumes that @SarahSimm’s partner is looking after herself, trying to stay in range, testing, eating sensibly. Maybe that’s not the case, in which case it isn’t the ongoing grind that wears us down, it’s the constant roller coaster of highs and lows and feeling like crap and the people around us stressing about immediate illness plus long-term complications.

Where’s your partner at, Sarah? Is she newly diagnosed and overwhelmed by the learning curve? Or is she a long-hauler but not caring much? (I was diagnosed at 9, but it took me until my mid-30s to smarten up and start looking after myself.) Or is she super-knowledgeable and totally on top of her care?

I think it’s interesting that you feel she isn’t sharing with you. Because in a sense, there’s not a lot to share, when you come down to it: “I have type 1 diabetes,” “I’m high so I don’t feel great,” “I’m low so I’m cranky,” “I’m frustrated by this.” I think holding stuff back in fact adds to your worry rather than protects you, because you don’t know what’s going on with her, and that’s not helpful in a relationship.

Oh, and personally I don’t mind a little intervention when I’m low, because I tend to put off treating, make excuses like “I’ll be eating soon” or “I just need to finish what I’m doing and then I’ll treat.” My partner’s “I think you’re low” (or his more pointed “Juice time!”) is always appreciated.

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It’s awesome to see you here, being supportive and being willing to learn. Being around someone with knowledge makes it easier to share and open up so keep being interested and learning and it will pay dividends. Nice to meet you! I find it very honorable to see you here. I hope that when my son grows up and gets his partner, that he or she show this level of compassion, curiosity and love.

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Hi y’all…Jeff here 51, Bartender, Surfer, Professional Beach Bum…Type 1 for 5 years (diagnosed) and found this forum by googling Dexcom and Surfing…I started wearing a Dexcom G6 Friday and will begin my new life as a “Podder” tomorrow. so many questions have already been answered by reading through topics. I am sure I will have a thousand more. Looking forward to this next chapter in the journey!!!

The difference in wearing the CGM is already crazy…feel like /i am chasing numbers…I had DMI and finger pricks pretty solid with a 7.1 a1c so far I feel like I am chasing numbers with the CGM…uggg…but this too will be conquered!!

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Hi @jeffsurfsncocktails, and welcome! There is a multitude of help here from the technically inclined to ultimate athletes, to extremely involved families to lurkers.

It sounds like you are doing well if your A1c is 7.1 at the 5 year mark, but I definitely understand about chasing numbers. There is a book out on the web that might resonate with you and also help stop the chase - it’s called Sugar Surfing by Stephen Ponder. There are also tons of Podders here, some looping some not, so ask away. :slight_smile:

Looking forward to hearing more about you and your surfing in the future!

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Already reading Sugar Surfing!!! about to get into the nitty gritty of it

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There is also info and videos on website.

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Welcome! Glad you found us. Even more excited we are showing up on relevant searches. My son chased the numbers for a couple of months then settled down and got his a1c into the 6’s where he was able to maintain it for a few years. I suspect you will be similar, i.e. chase it for awhile then begin to use it to figure out what was working and what wasn’t with each of the meals you eat. Which could result in an even lower A1c. Every meal is a test!

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