FUDiabetes

Summary & updates about new diabetes tech coming in 2021

Here’s a nice summary article of all the new diabetes tech coming (hopefully) in 2021:

This article had the first picture of the upcoming G7 that I’ve seen.

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Nice :slight_smile: Thanks for sharing!

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“This latest model of the Dexcom CGM is set to bring a significant form-factor change: a combined sensor and transmitter design.”

That’s nice… Less work!!

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@daisymae, check out this post for info on Libre2 and Libre3!

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I’m hoping the Libre 3 will work with Loop at some point soon – Samson hates having the G6 inserted, he finds it super painful. The Libre was a lot less painful for him.

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More painful than the G5? Sorry to hear that. :cry:

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FWIW, to me the G6 insertion is much better than the G5. I could never figure out if I was supposed to do the G5 slow or fast. It was never super comfortable no matter how I did it. The G6 is much easier.

And this is from someone who does IV injections, IM injections, and manual lancing without a lancing device. :man_shrugging:

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No the G5 was just as painful, only we actually used numbing cream with it. We haven’t been able to do that as much with G6 because it might die fairly unexpectedly, which leads to us having to change it out as quickly as possible.

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I guess I’m really lucky because Liam says he can’t even feel the G5 being inserted. But I go super fast in the pushing in and pulling out the plunger. We only used numbing cream once and his skin has a reaction to it. Glad to be over the screaming bloody murder phase. He’s fine with everything these days.

We did just have a gusher a few minutes ago with the G5 changeout… That freaked him out a little. :D. I just impressed the importance of keeping a cool head. I removed transmitter, cleaned blood away, waited until the bleeding stopped, re-cleaned the transmitter and popped it back in. I told him if we have signal issues we may need to do a new sensor but we’ll see how this one works out.

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I eventually learned from some post here on FU to sharply slap the end of the G5 plunger to insert the needle as fast as possible. Listen to how fast the G6 goes in when you press the button. I think that speed is why the G6 usually doesn’t hurt at all, at least in my case.

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Ya, that makes sense!

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I think it’s the speed of it going in, but also going out, since the whole thing is automated, vs with the G5 where there’s no real way to do both parts that fast or even close, so in addition to moving slower, the needle is inside you much longer.

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these are great advances, but I see a problem with being unable to use the pump directly to control insulin delivery.
It will be impossible to use it to bolus when your phone has no power, it has disconnected from blue tooth, or it cannot communicate with the pump because of other problems. This means we will have to take pens or syringes with us everywhere.

Am I missing something?

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Will we still have an option for a back-up controller? Last night my iPhone got the “black screen of death” and I thought I’d have to charge the receiver. Luckily a power off/reset brought it back online.

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I suppose that’s why pumps like the t:sport come with a (fixed dose) bolus button. You wouldn’t want to use it for a meal bolus, but in a pinch it could be made to work. It looks like maybe the Omnipod needs a separate device to command a bolus, but most pumps have some way to do it directly on the device.

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The current automated pumps have fallback settings, so can continue to deliver based on those default settings. Total failure if lose pump power for rechargeable pumps, or battery connection problems exist for current pumps. Many carry syringes as backup, to retrieve insulin from cartridge in worst case.

We tend to always carry glucose, so not much more effort to include minimal pump failure backup items at all/most times too.

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