FUDiabetes

Need for 1/2 unit syringes and needle length selection in Toddlers

#1

Also, do you have 1/2 unit syringes? I can send you some if you want. They are much easier to use.

I have the ones marked for 1/2 units that are 8mm needles. I have tons, so whatever you want, I can send you.
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If you want the shorter ones (6mm), you can get them from the site I mentioned in this thread:

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Some nights
#2

These are the only ones we’ve ever gotten…and the depth is freaking massive…I feel like it’s going to hit bone it goes so far in. We never use these because he hates them…the only time I’ve ever used it was when he was sleeping and doesn’t feel as much.

Are the 6mm 31g the ones we should get for him?

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#3

I use that length for IM, but really no other reason to use them.

So save those for when he is in high school, is 6’4" and playing on the school basketball team and wants to do an IM shot…

In the meantime, you don’t need to be using those for a 4 year old!

If you can get the 6mm 1/2 unit ones, that would be the best.

If you can’t get those, I can send you the 1/2 unit 8mm length.

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#4

I like the 8 mm ones best. I have a ton of these nano (4 mm) needle boxes because I messed up my 3 month order once. I’d be happy to give you all of them! They’re super tiny, and I’ve had insulin leak out. It may just be my skin type that’s the problem though.

I wondered if other people had problems with this, and I found this study documenting that using the nano needles had no impact on people’s A1cs. I don’t know if that means my skin is the problem or all the diabetics in the study upped their doses because they estimated some insulin would leak after every shot :rofl:

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#5

I think the 4mm needles suck.

They are promoting them because of the overly-cautions worry that people are accidentally doing IM injections with the longer ones. So they just want to push everyone into using shorter needles.

It’s akin to getting a 5.5 A1C and an endo saying it is too low. :roll_eyes:

The deeper depth will give faster absorption.

When they do those studies, they are not necessarily doing them on the elite diabetic community. So take that into consideration when you see stuff like that. Are they saying a person in the 5’s or 6’s didn’t have an increase in their A1C? Or are they saying a person in the 9’s, 10’s, or 11’s, didn’t have an increase?

You never know who was included in the study, so always apply what works for you. If you try 4mm’s and it does not work well for you, that is all that matters.

I will never go back to 4mm. They were horrible for me.

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#6

Yes, I stopped using them after a couple tries. Luckily I had a pretty decent stash of 8mm, so I didn’t have to pay out of pocket for more. Now I just have this massive supply of them that I’ll never touch. I should probably figure out how to donate them or something.

#7

Yeah, but shorter needles = BIG DEPTH in a toddlers body, though…you have to think, their arms and legs are so much tinier than a grown ups arms. The ones I posted above are so long in his body I really feel like it will touch bone.

(My wrist is bigger than his upper arm by a pretty sizable amount…) that gives some perspective.

#8

Oh, yes of course.

My comment on 4mm needles is geared toward adults who are experienced. I would not suggest using anything longer on a young one!

Unfortunately, BD does not make a syringe with a 4mm needle AND 1/2 unit markings. The shortest BD syringe that has 1/2 unit marks is the 6mm.

But those 1/2 unit marks are VERY helpful.

Anyway, 2 different conversations here! Needle length for kids and for adults!

BTW, I have no idea why a pediatric endo would have given you syringes that are so long for a little baby. Wasn’t he two?!?

That is insane.

Get the 1/2 unit 6mm if you can. If not, lemme know and I will hook you up with the 8mm’s.

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#9

Yep, those were the ones they have prescribed for us and we’re going to change it. I have only ever used them a couple times - they’re just massive for him.

Will update our prescription for the 1/2 unit, 6mm, 31 gauge.

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#10

Funny thing…so I primed my Humalog pen before my night snack last night bc of FUD yesterday…then I was multitasking when giving the injection via 4mm pen needle…then I used poor technique and ended up w either (1) a leak or (2) the primed insulin on the cap area might have just dropped onto my skin since there was some loose insulin due to priming.

Moral: priming is the devil (just kidding)

I love 4mm pen needles and used them on MDI when I was always in the 5.5% ballpark.

My doctor accidentally prescribed me 5mm 31g pen needles and I can’t stand them.

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#11

Glad it works for you!! Technique was definitely not the problem when I used them. I think it might be something with my skin. You’re a bunch skinnier than me too, so maybe the pen is reaching further.

#12

I was 5 and I think needles were even longer back then. And there were not really many options available!

My dad made a plastic insert that fit on the syringe. It was like a cuff that reduced the injection depth.

My parents were bosses of the disease way back then. They did so much that was out of the normal treatment.

The common treatment plan was that you would go back to the doctor every few months and let them adjust your doses. Ha! Yeah, right! They adjusted it themselves. Doctors had no say in it with my parents.

Sorry to get sidetracked. I need to write a post on it some day. All the things they did! :hugs:

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#13

@T1Allison
Real quick - point the needle down when priming!!

If you prime pointing up, insulin drips on the barrel of the needle. Then when you inject, that insulin drops back onto the surface of your skin, and you are not sure if you had a leak.

If you already know this, please forgive my mentioning it!

Prime down, not up!!!

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Proper Priming Technique for Pens
#14

It all makes sense now. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

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#15

Yeah I figured that out last night while cussing all you guys. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

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#16

you sound like you had really awesome parents @Eric !!Are they still around?

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#17

This explains everything! :stuck_out_tongue:

I hope Liam is just like you (but that will depend, it seems, on how WE are!)

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#18

Sorry, day late!

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#19

Good news, my small pants didn’t fit and I’m back in my Big Girl Pants! So excited! More skin means better podding for me!

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#20

Those are what I use if I’m not bolusing my whole dose via pod.

When I use pens, I use the Nano 4mm needles. Never had any leaking problem with them. 4mm is basically 3/16 inch, so I’d think they’d be safe for a child – and perhaps less painful or at least less terrifying than a bigger needle? @ClaudnDaye, if needle depth is the issue, why not use a pen with the shorter pen needle instead of a syringe?

Or prime up, but tap the pen against a finger before injecting, to flick off any stray insulin.

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