CeQur Simplicity

I am lada on MDI. I just heard of this device that delivers bolus insulin for three days. Just with a click. No PDM or tubes. Not a pump but seems like a good alternative. Has anyone tried? I just asked Endo for a script.

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Here is more detail. Simple, for bolus only, and can dose 2 unit increments.
Change every 3 days.

“Each simultaneous squeeze of these buttons delivers two units of rapid-acting insulin.”

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I read an article about CeQur because the title said it was “new” technology and not a pump. While I’m sure it has it’s place, I just don’t get the hoopla. Strikes me as a manual 3-day patch pump; you click a button to dose 2-units per click with sufficient on-board insulin for 3-days. Unless there’s a significant price difference between it and Omnipods (any variety), I don’t see much “new” or “advanced” in the tech or methodology. It actually seems a step backwards from most existing pumps, though it apparently doesn’t need batteries or a pdm so perhaps good in some environments. Again unless there’s a huge price difference, I don’t see it as game changer for most people.

Perhaps I missed something in the ad?

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Thanks for bringing this to our attention. I can understand why the simplicity of CeQur will appeal to some people…there is nothing to carry with you for a bolus: no pen, phone, syringe or pump controller. Good luck trying it out, I hope it works out great for you.

Thank you for your replies. I was on omnipod but way too expensive under Medicare. I had a Medtronic pump also. Just wanted a break from pumps. I don’t mind MDI but for me this device would eliminate many pokes and also don’t need to carry any supplies with me. With the omnipod you must remember the PDM or it is useless. I will go back to a pump at some point I’m sure but right now none of the pumps out there excite me enough. My A1c stays in the mid 5’s no matter how I get my insulin. But now I heard of the I Port advance from Medtronic. A little port you change every three days and all of your insulin is injected into this one device. So now looking into both methods. I think the port is a very reasonable price. Would still carry insulin pens. Shame I hear of all this on YouTube and not my Endo.

Jane Cerullo

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Unless you loop. I haven’t carried the PDM for Liam for years. Just the phone, which everyone always has anyway.

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This Medtronic iPort is a really strange invention. It’s basically an infusion set with a stopper top instead of a tube. Whenever you want to take insulin, you stick your pen or syringe into this stopper and inject, rather than sticking your needle directly into your skin. I think I’d rather stick a tiny needle directly into my skin in various spots, rather than sticking in a big infusion site needle once every three days and still having to do all the injections anyway.

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Hi. I see your posts about Liam all the tile. I realize I can loop but don’t want to give ups control and am not really interested in any of the pumps out there. Just looking to inject less for now. Thank you for responding.

Jane Cerullo

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@Jane17 The point you made a fewer injections is a good one, and it’s “invasive” to other activities and more discreet if you’re concerned about other’s perspectives/sensitivities.

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@ClaudnDaye I agree that for most people the phone has become indispensable. However, I know I used to work in highly sensitive “classified” subjects that prohibited use of electronic devices. I’ve often wondered how T1s and others with medical tech get by in those environs, this CeQur device might be good for those areas, though it does nothing for the CGM side that you’d need for corrections. I’m sure there’s some “accommodation”, but it builds in a terrible security weakness.

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I think this would be a great option if there was more flexibility in the dosing. Only having 2 unit doses is a big drawback.

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Right now not a concern for me. Am on Tepezza infusions for TED and side effect is hyperglycemia. So never give myself less than 2 units. That’s why interested in the device. Dosing a lot of insulin. For now I hope will be useful so don’t have to inject so much. If I end up getting it, will let you all know how I do. You guys are so awesome.

Jane Cerullo

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Loop has given us MORE control, not less. More sleep, more peace, better A1C (last was 5.6), less lows (hangs around 1% low/severe low). Control was why we moved to loop. Having said that though, I’m not advocating loop for you. Everyone is different with different goals, motivations and reasons for the decisions they make!

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Same. While in a SCIF, I had to leave my electronics outside the room. I’m not sure if diabetics can request waivers or not though for certain devices is they are medical in nature, or needed for medical purposes. Did you ever attempt to gain access in that way?

I agree with your take on the level of control. Even for those that want to control for themselves, the nightime/sleeping peace is wonderful. Loop gives the best nighttime control I think possible for the great majority of people. For daytime/waking hours, you can use Loop in manual mode except for basal. That said, what works for the individual’s purpose and use is what counts…

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@ClaudnDaye I’ve been out of SCIF and SAP environs for several years and hadn’t been dx’d when in them, so no experience seeking waiver. I doubt the requirements have changed much, medical waivers and accommodations have become more widespread, but the tech threats have skyrocketed and shrunk in size concurrently. The likes of any device with memory or recording are still (and appropriately) restricted.

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The new device is essentially a 3-day wearable dumb insulin pen. It’s hard to imagine it being less expensive than syringes for MDI or less prone to user error.

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