AquilX CGM, plus lactate and alcohol sensor

Anyone see this??

Looks promising from a UCSD lab. Small CGM that also monitors alcohol and lactate. Transmitter and electronics are reusabe and wirelessly charged. Only in startup phase now though with more testing needed.

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Interesting idea, but as usual no mention of how long each sensor lasts, accuracy, or latency that we would be interested in.
I also don’t how useful those other two signals would be. I know when I’ve had a drink and I know when I’ve been exercising. Why would you need a biomarker for muscle fatigue when you can feel muscle fatigue?
But I do have a question for everyone about this line from the article:
“Monitoring alcohol levels is useful because drinking alcohol can lower glucose levels.”
Is this actually a thing for anyone? Alcohol does nothing to my blood sugar. The carbs in some drinks will raise it, but I’ve never noticed any effect from the alcohol itself. Is this true for anyone?

And yes, I know that you should never go low while drinking because your liver will be processing the alcohol and unable to dump glucagon.

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I can go low several hours later after a couple of glasses of wine with a meal or at a party, even if I have a small snack at bedtime. Go figure!

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I have not experienced a change in BG that I could attribute to alcohol. But I did hear a claim that during the metabolization of alcohol by the liver, the release of glucose in response to glucagon is inhibited.

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Yes, alcohol definitely effects my BG, typically several hours after I’ve had a drink. The worst is that I don’t seem to feel the low like I would normally, it comes on so fast, where I’ve actually passed out. For me, alcohol is pretty dangerous.

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