What to expect from 1st endo appt

Relatively new to diabetes (I am insulin-dependent) and tomorrow I got off the waitlist to see my endocrinologist for the first time ever! I’ve spoken to him a couple of times over the past year but all via video visit due to the pandemic, and I’m oddly anxious. Any idea what to expect for a first-time/new/routine endocrinology visit? Is it just an in-person discussion, or do they do a body checkup or anything? Should I expect to be weighed in person? Would love some thoughts from the peanut gallery based on your experience.

Also, not sure if I tagged this properly, so mods, if this should be tagged differently, please let me know!

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I was getting diabetes care from my primary care dr for 15 years before seing the endo just a few months ago, he read my chart, they weigh and check bp, read your cgm data (or log if you dont have a cgm) and take an a1c test, and then a chat, and maybe an insulin adjustment…painless so not to worry :slight_smile:

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Make sure you write down all your questions and concerns before you go, including RX refills needed. When I don’t do that, I always forget something! :interrobang:

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At my son’s last endo they also did a quick scan of injection/pump sites if there is anything to see and did a fingerstick A1c, or a blood draw to get the A1c.

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They check weight, height, BP, take a finger stick for an A1C test and then it’s just time to talk to the Endo to review charts, ask questions, get recommendations, discuss prescriptions, etc.

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Yes, most definitely would forget stuff knowing me! :wink:

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Don’t expect anything. For certain aim for an in-person discussion; an endo in SF or in Houston should be able to do that. Ignore the routine; whatever they want to check/weigh/measure won’t affect what a good doctor does, which is to talk to her patient/client/employer.

You will certainly know.

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As you’ve already had telemed visits, you may already have covered the basic questions/concerns. Not sure who/how you were prescribed insulin (possibly PCP?). I heartily endorse @CatLady and others recommendation to write down questions/concerns you may have…too easy to forget things you intended to cover. Don’t recall you’re previous comments on what you’re taking, on/not on pump/MDI/CGM, etc., examples could include: Is CGM recommended, if so, which and why? Review of current basal/bolus, ICR, ISF, GMI, charts you may have. Is current insulin still valid/dosage or is something else warranted and why? Is CDE/nutritionist recommended or is one on staff with Dr? Does Doc have an NP on staff you can see in addition/in place of doc? Is pump a recommendation, which and why versus other systems? Are you interested in participating in clinical studies? Are you a candidate for any? Does Dr recommend any?

I’m an admitted nerd, and I find the what, why and options important toward informed consent, vice just accepting the docs decisions. You may already have covered this and it depends on any relationship/trust you have established, but you have a right to be in the drivers seat, research and advocate for yourself; does the doc agree and act that way or do you need a different doc/practice?

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Thank you, it’s like you read my mind! :upside_down_face:

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Thanks! Was especially curious about whether they would do this, but I just got back and they did not go through injection/pump sites at all. I suppose it must vary by doctor…

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This was pretty much 100% what they did! So thank you for the heads-up :smiley:

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These are all REALLY good and useful questions; thank you. I definitely kept them in mind going into today’s appointment.

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Sorry I missed the “tomorrow” you mentioned and wrote away, glad it seemed useful. Here’s hoping all went well and you had a good experience with a good doc!

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I understand I missed my opportunity to comment on your question but want to share a thought on Endo’s in general. Not all Endo’s are created equal. Some are very detailed and knowledgeable while others are less helpful in providing guidance and direction. Over the 30 years of being a T1D, I have had my share of both good and ‘not so good’ endos. Come prepared with your questions and if you feel you are not getting the information and help you expected, keep searching for one that can answer your questions and help you manage your disease. There are good ones out there. Good luck.

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I have been lucky. I am in my eighties and have had type 1 for over 60 years. All my many endos have been very helpful but I must admit my latest has caused me more amusement than usual. I was in her office and she was explaining something about diabetes, she stopped talking, put her forehead on her desk and started laughing. Then she told me that she had just realized that I had been dealing with the problem since before she was born!

Made me feel a rather old!

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Did you bill her for the diabetes / education appointment? :smile:

Living with the disease as long as you have is an impressive accomplishment. The evolution of diabetes management has changed (and continues to change) and based on your long life with it, it sounds like you have done a great job of navigating thru it.

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You are lucky. Your first 20 years were the highest risk and the most difficult. That you survived makes me appreciate what you learned as you were going through through that. I wish my father had.

I’ve had many doctors and a few endos. I’ve never been amused by them knowing less about practical aspects of diabetes or recent research than I did. Instead I found it disappointing and scary, that I had to lead conversations to get them to do what I needed to have done.

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@Cattell Perhaps old, but also apparently wiser and in this case respected! I give your Endo credit for realizing and stating her recognition of you as an authority. Would that more doctors and medical people would realize the same. Admittedly, they have to/should be careful and assess the knowledge level of their patients. Some T1s do ignore or blindly follow the chosen paths as is their right to do, but some of us also educate ourselves by study and practical experience and could help the medical community understand what being T1 is about and how to deal with it. I don’t know how else your Endo performs, but she’s taken one big step in being a keeper!

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