FUDiabetes

Still nothing for young people where COVID is concerned

Great news of course with the vaccines currently under production, but it sounds like one of them is only for 16+ and the other is for 18+. Still nothing for younger children…and that’s concerning to me because Liam is THE person that I most need to get vaccinated. I understand that once millions of adults get the vaccines and enough time passes to see what long-term issues may result from the vaccination (if any) that they will probably then begin testing in younger children…but I’m wondering, and haven’t gotten much information on when we can expect to get vaccines into younger childrens arms - especially those who are high risk! If Liam doesn’t get the vaccine, it doesn’t matter how many others in my house can get it…if he can’t get it, we are still on lock-down until Liam can get the vaccine shots.

Anyone have additional info on kids (young - under 16) vaccines?

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The vaccines first out of the gate hvae been the mRNA vaccines. These are based on completely new technology that has never been used before. There are more traditional vaccines that will be coming in the new year that may not require as much study and caution as completely new technologies. From what I have heard, trials of the vaccines in kids will start soon, if they haven’t started already.

The idea with “herd immunity” is that if enough people get immunized, it protects those who can’t get immunized for whatever reason (allergic to the vaccine, immunocompromised, etc.). I actually think that, based on research about where kids tend to be picking up the virus (mostly household transmission), it would probably be pretty protective if the whole family had the vaccine and one child didn’t. Newer research is also indicating that Type 1 diabetes may not actually be a huge risk factor, especially in younger people with tight control.

Unfortunately, we will all have to continue following whatever precautions we’ve been taking for at least the next 6-12 months (a hard pill to swollow, when I first heard this). By then, when life can start to get back to feeling safe again, I’m sure that there will be vaccines available for kids, since there are already trials starting.

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Honestly, even with T1, my guess is he won’t be in line for a vaccination for quite some time would be my guess, so I imagine by then it will be tested. I would be surprised if kids with T1 are getting pushed ahead, since I don’t think data suggests for that age group there’s an increased risk of mortality. Of course, I’d still consider him higher risk and be careful if he were my kid, but honestly, the way the long term effects of this virus are striking and potential permanent harms, I think everyone should consider themselves at risk for serious COVID consequences, even if death is unlikely.

As an almost 40 year adult with T1, I’m not at all sure I’ll be given priority because of my T1D at this point. I think it’s a real open question as to how we are dealt with.

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Yes, 100% this. I read an article the other day that said new studies are shwoing that some cases of severe COVID-19 and many of the long-term effects people are experiencing after recovery (even after a mild illness) may be caused by an autoimmune process.

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It also looks like a lot like chronic Lyme disease. Which might suggest that as some think, a lot of chronic Lyme symptoms are from post-infectious damage vs ongoing infection, but in either case, seems to involve symptoms across a number of systems as well as some very specific hard to describe ones (some of which sound like autonomic nervous system damage to me, but not all exactly typical dysautonomia). My partner has chronic Lyme and finds the descriptions of long-hauler COVID patients to be eerily similar to hers and other Lymie’s experiences.

Also, it’s similar in that it’s as of yet, hard to predict who has these symptoms—sometimes they are arising in previously perfectly healthy young people. My partner was an athletic otherwise very healthy person except for the Lyme.

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Johnson and Johnson is in starting a trial on younger kids, I think 12-17?
But beyond that, they will be the last to be vaccinated for sure. No trials on kids Liam (or Samson’s) age have even begun. Once they open, I will 100% figure out a way to get Samson into one if possible.

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Also, FDA just approved an over-the-counter antigen-based COVID-19 test. If those can ramp up significantly in terms of production, that could help with keeping our kids safe, in that you can perhaps get to meaningful surveillance testing in schools.

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If you hear of one, please let me know!?! I would also enroll Liam (IF he agreed that he wanted to be enrolled in it…I would first explain to him what it is, why it’s important but also be up front about him agreeing to be a guinea pig basically.) If he didn’t want to get enrolled, I wouldn’t enroll him.

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Moderna also starting trial for 12-18

Sounds like they want to determine dosing amount.

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It appears that most states are going to phase the vaccine in line with the CDC guidelines:
Framework for Equitable Allocation of COVID-19 Vaccine_Highlights.pdf (nap.edu)

According to the CDC he might be able to receive vaccine in Phase 2, which includes “people of all ages with comorbid and underlying conditions that put them at moderately higher risk, defined as having one of the conditions listed by CDC as being associated with increased risk of severe COVID-19.” Unless they move Type 1 up to “significant risk”, in which case I would expect he should fit Phase 1b. Agree with earlier comments that the vaccines have yet to be approved under age 18, which also needs to happen.

Here in WA some vaccine delivery numbers were publicized that led me to believe that Phase 1a will be ramping up very quickly and Phase 1b could start as early as January 2021.

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yes, I think the Phase 1B folks will for sure be vaccinated by mid-to-late-January. Who goes next is the big question, and it also depends on whether we can negotiate more vaccine from Pfizer and/or another big producer comes up with a vaccine we will approve for our population.

I am pretty optimistic that folks with T1D who are adults will be vaccinated by June. I’m bummed that my son won’t be able to attend his diabetes camp in the summer though, which I don’t know for sure but am pretty confident will be the case.

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Yeah, I don’t think life will get close to normalish until Fall or Winter 2021, but I could be wrong. I hope it’s sooner. My partner and I will continue to be extremely careful until both of us are vaccinated (right now, unclear which of us will be first, for different reasons), and even then, will probably be more comfortable going into public masked spaces than we currently are and will feel more ok germ podding again with close family and friends who are also vaccinated, but until we have high levels throughout the community, I don’t think we will be back to normal behavior. We still don’t know if vaccinated people can transmit the virus, even if they themselves don’t get sick (much like children can and do).

One thing of major concern to me is the number of people already opting out of vaccination. I’m connected to some of the local academic med centers, and I know a significant number of non-MD staff at least one of the local hospitals are refusing the vaccine. shakes head I do get it if you are someone with severe allergies, especially with anaphylaxis, to delay it until more info about people with similar allergic conditions handle it, but otherwise this is likely one of the safest vaccines out there. It never fails to surprise me how uneducated on science some medical professionals are—I’ve heard psych nurses expressing concerns about catching the flu from flu shots, so I wish this were more out of line with my prior experiences, but it’s not.

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Here are details

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$30 each well that is a bit disappointing. I would have hoped it would be more in the $3-5 range. Since my insurer doesn’t charge me anything for a test and can test me with one day’s notice, not sure who would pay for this.

AND… Abbott just got approval for their $5 paper strips to be used at home.

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Throw normal pricing out the window during the pandemic. A while ago when they were hard to get, Clorox wipes were selling for $50 on Amazon by some resellers who had them in stock.

The other side of it though, is that if they were $5, someone would buy a hundred and hoard them, or buy a thousand and resell them. The $30 price keeps that somewhat in-check.

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Me too – but they may not be opting out forever. According to a story in Canada’s national newspaper, in what is perhaps Canada’s hardest-hit province, at a long-term care home in Montreal:

While 95 per cent of residents signed up [for a vaccination], only 35 per cent to 40 per cent of the home’s 500 workers did … “They’re not against it, they’re hesitant. They don’t want to be first,” [associate CEO] Ms. Dupuis said. “They said, ‘Yes, but not now. We’ll wait for the next wave when we see how people react.’ ” [Quebec Health Minister Christian] Dubé said he is not concerned. “I don’t think we should read too much into those numbers,” Mr. Dubé said. “In the first groups we will see the most enthusiastic people. In coming weeks, I’m convinced more will sign up.”

Let’s hope this is the case, in the general population as well. Among my friends, at least, a “let’s wait and see a bit” attitude is common.

Abbott would seem to be the winner.

Here is the summary of the latest CDC prioritization. Phase 1c now includes ages 16-64 with Type 1 or 2 diabetes among others. Since Phase 1c has 129 million people nationwide it will be up to each state to decide how to prioritize among those 129 million. The general category of “the rest of the essential workers” is also in Phase 1c.
PowerPoint Presentation (cdc.gov)

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I might have jumped the gun…an article by AARP says Type 2 diabetes is considered high risk under Phase 1c meaning Type 1 might have to wait till Phase 2.

Interesting article about the coordination and tracking of vaccine doses. Chances look good that this tracking setup has too many moving parts and is doomed to fail. By the time the vaccine gets to the Type 1 diabetics they might be using fax machines.

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