FUDiabetes

30% reduction in T1D in kids under 4 years old when vaccinated for rotovirus

I ran across this article here- https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/vaccines-in-the-news-the-good-the-bad-and-the-imminent-loss-of-our-measles-elimination-status/

This was part of the “good”, but unfortunately it only worked for kids under age 4 and it only worked for full vaccination. But final line of the abstract was “Rotavirus vaccination may be the first practical measure that could play a role in the prevention of this disease.”

Full article here- https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-44193-4

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I would bet money that flu vaccinations would also show a beneficial effect. I know so many T1s, myself included, whose diabetes developed soon after a serious illness like the flu. Hard to say if it would have happened anyway, but given that so many more people have genes that increase risk than have diabetes, it seems like there has to be environmental components, and infections seem like a very probably component of what triggers it. Who knows, maybe if you prevent more severe infections, you can keep that trigger from from going off. It’s ironic to me that I’ve seen on other forums people advising parents with kids with a family history of T1 to avoid vaccinations—I’d give the opposite advice, get all the vaccines you can for anything you might reasonably contract.

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Basically there are so many bugs out there that I’m guessing there are several that cause inflammation in the pancreas and/or have some kind of viral epitope that is vaguely similar to the target in Type 1, and they can trigger the disease. I really do strongly suspect that an initial illness somehow precipitated it for Samson.

Our son had a bad case of hand, foot and mouth disease about 4 months before his diagnosis – so bad his fingernails fell off. And then about a month before onset, he had a case of something – fever, sore throat, runny nose, and a little diarrhea. His onset was very severe. His BG was very high but his A1C was low, and his antibodies were incredibly high.

that said, I get why people with autoimmune conditions are a little worried about vaccinating for the flu. I’m a little wary of Samson getting the flu vaccine this year myself, because he had the flu vaccine 3 weeks before he had the onset of autoimmune encephalitis last year – right around this time. Some part of me (the illogical, possibly superstitious part of me) wants to avoid recreating the conditions that prevailed last year. He’s also scheduled to have a neurology appointment in a few weeks to possibly discontinue his anti-seizure medication. My thinking is that either we could avoid a relapse by avoiding recreating last year’s conditions, or if it did crop up again, maybe we could disentangle somehow which things might have potentially triggered it. So we went to Yosemite last year around this time, but we decided to skip the same trip this year. And we had the flu shot around mid-October. Maybe we could either do it earlier or later. And I want the tapering of the anti-seizure medication to occur as separated in time from the flu shot as possible, as weird as that sounds. Encephalitis is a known (but very rare) side effect of some vaccinations. So it’s not impossible that this was a trigger.

I’ve always thought the vaccine avoider people were being incredibly irrational. But having a kid with a mysterious disease really does do a number on you, and I have a lot more sympathy for people now who avoid vaccines (whose kids are medically fragile, at least – the ones with perfectly healthy kids who are just avoiding I think are a different story.)

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I can understand all of that!

In my personal experience, I’ve never had what seems like any major adverse reactions to vaccines. I have had multiple suspected instances of chronic illness or chronic worsening of conditions due to infections though—both the flu seeming to trigger diabetes, and EBV infection causing permanent damage to soft tissue in lower extremities and worsening of effects of my connective tissue disorder (a very common thing reported in that community, that symptoms permanently worsened following infections like EBV, Lyme, etc). So I worry much more about autoimmune responses to actual infection than vaccinations, and about the permanent damage infections can do. I wish there were an EBV vaccination, although it’s one of the reasons I caution teens/young adults in particular to be careful about wearing themselves down to extremes, because it seems like something people only tend to get when their systems are already under stress. (I was a freshman in college and tremendously sleep deprived when I got mono.)

That said, there’s probably not one simple answer about this, and I think everyone’s experiences are going to make them cautious about different things. @TiaG, your response seems pretty reasonable—not assuming any of those factors are the problem, but making it so that you’re more able to see a pattern if one does exist. I hope that it ends up having been a super fluky thing, and you never get any additional data!

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It sure does…

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Way back in the fall of 1979, I had a sore throat, soon followed by Pleurisy. Then I ended up hospitalized in DKA & Dx’d with type-2 diabetes. I went thru h311 with a long, 26month honeymoon. I was in for a minor surgery and they discovered I was a type-1. Actually I am a type-1b, a rare subtype of type-1.
Bottom line: I have multiple autoimmune issues. including Multiple Sclerosis, Addison’s (primary autoimmune), Psoriasis & Rheumatic Heart disease valves.

Guess I hit the AI lottery :confounded:

Gomer

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Wow! that is quite a collection of autoimmune issues. Are you able to manage all of those reasonably well? Seems like one is plenty, but you got back in the AI line a couple more times. Must of been a good sale.

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Yes, my plate is a bit overflowing with autoimmune issues. My new Addison’s, Sx last year after the MORTpital insulin murder attempt, complicates my diabetes control some. I became “brittle” until I started steroids for the Addison’s. Now that was a WILD ride!

My Multiple Sclerosis had been stable for a decade, but I think it has been awakened,

and on the march again, due to the COMA they had me in.

On Feb 28, 2018 I had a syncope, fainted, and crash landed on the floor of my home basement shop. A few cuts & bruises, no broken bones, stiches, contusions etc, The wanted to keep me overnight just for “observation”, as a precaution. It sounded reasonable, so I agreed.

To make a long story short; The next morning, a male RN said he was injecting a med for

nausea, I noted I did not, had not had any nausea, he did not reply. Then the female RN

asked if she could give me my insulin, it was just after 8 am, appropriate for morning Lantus,

so I said “yes”. I watched as she started injecting my Lantus, directly into my veins via my IV port.

I quickly lapsed into a coma before I could ask her what the H311 she was doing.

I quickly got my answer. She immediately started boasting to the male RN, how she got me to

give her permission to kill me.

Then, less than 4 hrs later the hospital log notes she gave me yet another shot of Lantus. Then

about 3 hrs later, they did an EEG, to verify I was comatose.

Around 3:30 am or so, I suddenly came out of the coma. 2 caregivers (1 apparently was the male RN from the previous morning). were leaving my room, they talked about having given me yet another injection. Them they stopped at my doorway, talking to someone in the hall. One of the 2 announced, “He’s a DEAD MAN”, immediately followed by LOL. I did not think my death was a laughing matter. I then quietly looked to my right for the telemetry monitor. I could not see it, no light, nor numbers or graphics, NOTHING. All the lights, and everything in my room was OFF! They had turned it off, unplugged it or removed it from my room. Because of that, they did not know I had come out of the coma.

I played dead, I was TIRED, & decided they were unlikely to return, since they thought

I was dead, at least till the day shift came on. Thinking I should be safe, maybe until morning,

I grabbed some needed sleep. My records correctly noted I was “irritable”, “frustrated” and demanded to be released.

I will never forget the very, very hard to describe look on the doctors face that morning… The best I have been able to come up with is NON-PLUS. It’s French in origin and translates to “NO MORE”. It was as if he was perplexed, confused, Shocked, could not believe I survived their double attempt, especially the insulin murder attempt.

There is a lot more to this, a whole lot more, but this is the basics. Oh, the previous failed attempt was tried just hours before the insulin directly into my veins. I went thru H311 with the Addison’s plus diabetes in the following months. I eventually got a new endo to replace my literal Jekyll & Hyde endo and proper treatment.

Gomer